Annie Swynnerton

Also known asAnnie Louisa Robinson Swynnerton
NationalityEnglish
SkillsPainter
Born1844
DiedOctober 24, 1933

Paintings of Annie Swynnerton

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  Swynnerton’s righteousness in fighting for freedom of speech and expression never gets better than it does in the painting of a quietly confident Henry James. He lived during her times, but he was also an elderly person for her times. He died in 1915, when Swynnerton had already gained recognition as a British political activist, painter and intellectual. Until then, James had left a legacy that was unparalleled by any contemporary visionary, thinker or philosopher. Henry James was one of the most forward-thinking visionaries of the 19th Century. His fight for independent expression resounded with feminists and suffragettes of the time. It is no surprise that Swynnerton would take time out to paint a rather confident-looking portrait of Henry James. Although James looks rather […]

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“Portrait of a Boy” carries the weight of character more than anything else. Besides, the choice of medium by Swynnerton is simply breathtaking. If I were to imagine someone painting a subject like this, watercolor, pastel and ink would be the safest guesses. However, Swynnerton’s subject is all about strength of character. She loved immortalizing young boys, for whom she might have been unable to recollect identities. It is clear that the little boy’s posture is impressive, and there is all the innocence in his good-natured face, which also carries an element of disciplining history. Swynnerton belonged in the times of conservative ideologies, conflicting with leftist ideals of feminism, socialism and equal pay for women. It was a noble thing to be on that side, […]

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The sense of light can be a very special feeling, especially when you have remained indoors, or gained vision by some miracle after blindness. The presence of a miracle is quite obvious in Annie Swynnerton’s painting here in oil-on-canvas, deliberately portrayed through the wings of the angelic woman. However, this has more to do with the woman being an angelic being, rather than just anyone receiving a miraculous decree. The hopeful look into the sky is so unblemished, that she hopes it will culminate into complete euphoria pretty soon. Swynnerton is a woman of courage – something one can find in her paintings. Although she was a major contributor in feminism in the early 1900s, her admiration for miracles, characters, principled people, uniqueness and innocence […]

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Annie Swynnerton is a well-remembered name among art lovers irrespective of their backgrounds. Whether you are rich, poor, industrious, lazy, Socialist or a right wing, appreciating the suffragette’s works is unavoidable because they make the presence of character and individual strength quite evident despite your possible willingness to accept that Swynnerton may have renounced God. While Joan of Arc believed in God to an extent Swynnerton may have found ridiculous or even laughable, the fact remains that Swynnerton’s works has seen the addition of a new character in the old line up of inspiring women. Remember that in other works, where she has painted male portraits, the subjects are either too old or too young to fit the description of the classical hero that pervaded the Renaissance art movements. Annie Swynnerton seems to be more leniently […]

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