Paintings of Vincent Van Gogh

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Among the many series of self-portraits, family members, peasants, still-life, cypresses and farmers there, he produced a series of sunflowers proclaiming: “You may know that the peony is Jeannin’s, the hollyhock belongs to Quost, but the sunflower is mine in a way.” The current still-life painting is from the same series being as the forth version of the sunflowers. He painted it while his stay in Arles in 1888 just two years before his death. His fascination towards sunflowers was due to his intention to decorate his house just before his beloved friend Paul Gauguin (the same friend with whom he had the infamous fight) intended to come at his house for some times. There is his signature visible on the left side of the […]

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Being in our post of Legend of Vincent van Gogh, the Dutch artist’s this priciest portrait with a huge price tag of $ 71.5 million around 15 years before in 1998 was the third costliest painting of all the time and fourth if we consider the price-inflation. And it is still an impressive rank for a portrait. Alongside with its enormous price-tag there are other facts which make this painting unique from the rest of the self-portraits by Vincent van Gogh which are totals more than 35. This self-portrait executed in 1889, was the last self-portrait by the artist. After that he majorly focused upon the cypresses and wheat fields. Moreover, this is the only painting depicting the artist without beard. As Van Gogh’s many […]

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Painting executed in the same city and in the same month, in which the Café Terrace at Night was produced, Starry Night over the Rhone captures a different view and different angle of the beautiful city cited in Paris. Rhone – that which rolls – is an important river running through Arles. Its importance and the beauty at night maybe allured the artist to illustrate it with oil on his canvas. Van Gogh has never tried to depict scene in their natural conditions. He always twisted the scenes and added imaginary colors and portions to the scene to get the exact impact he willed for. Adding artificial color to the image was a new idea in his time and Van Gogh used it very well […]

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Van Gogh’s one of the last paintings, Bedroom in Arles depicts his trapezoid shaped room of his Yellow House which he rented for some time during his stay in Arles. He sent his paintings to his brother Theo from time to time just for a general review about them. He made total of three version of the same painting. The first one was just a depiction of his room while the necessity of the second version aroused due to the damage by the flood of the Rhone. His brother suggested him to draw another version. Thus the second version emerged in September 1889. The last version simply called as The Bedroom was executed in smaller size than the original calling it the reduction. Three of […]

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Exaggerated portrayal of a real place in Arles, France, Café Terrace at Night is much revered painting. In modern times, the real café on which the artist drew his painting is renamed as the Café Van Gogh and is reconstructed so it could look like the café in the painting. That’s the height of the painter in today’s time. Many visitors visit the café and stands at where Van Gogh placed his easel. As Van Gogh wrote in his letter to his brother Theo, the painting doesn’t depict the exact scenario of the place. The bright orangish-yellow and green texture of the café is the artist’s creation as well as the brightly blue starry night which artist described as a containing poor pale whitish light. […]

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An inspiration for many, this painting has become Van Gogh’s most famous art work of all time as it has appeared in many TV shows and a movie. Van Gogh painted it while being in a room of Saint Remy’s. Nevertheless, as many people believe that it is literal depiction of the outer view from the windows of the room, the truth is Van Gogh did many displacement and add-ons to the scene to make it more perfect. The village and the blue sky are true to the real nature and there is no mention about any changes (as he did change the location of a constellation in his previous painting Starry Night over the Rhone). But the cypress is totally added and the mountain […]

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  Description of St. Remy by George Hruby, one of our readers, who personally has visited the place: “St. Remy is a small village that goes upward in elevation towards a mountain pass.  The hospital that Van Gogh was at is located on the edge of the village at the very top, probably to be secluded somewhat from the rest of the village below.  It was set among olive groves which are still there today but what was simply surreal was that also, as you walk out of the hospital grounds (which they allowed him to do to paint), you are immediately among the ruins of a Roman city called “Glanum.”  One of his paintings is in fact of a Roman road lined with olive […]

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